These four rams played a significant role in the development of what you see at Lone Star Farm today.  Keeping twenty-five rams can be a little tricky at times, but fun and challenging as well.  Some come and quickly go, but others, like these four, were here as an intricate piece of our breeding program as they grew to become a part of what we live and breathe.  These four were affectionately known as 'the Big Boys".  The other rams had to cow-tow and do their bidding if there was going to be peace in the pasture.  Yet, they had a camaraderie with each other that was undeniable.  They were always fair with the other rams as they broke up scuffles and stood up for the underdog  Boris, in particular, was a better babysitter than most ewes, when it came to taking care of the weanling rams.  The ewes were pushovers and had trouble getting the wiry young rams to pay attention, but Boris quickly drew the line letting them know he was their hero as long as they didn't cross it.  The only ram he ever fought with was his brother, Drago, typical sibling rivalry.  However, the "big event" between them left Boris with a damaged eye and he soon lost his sight in that eye.  After that, the two of them were never allowed to be in the same pasture together.  Boris was put in charge of the weanlings where we discovered his true talent.

As astute observers of our website, I'm sure some of you have noticed that the pictures and pedigrees of some of our familiar breeding rams have been retired.  It was with much sadness in our hearts that we made the hard decision to euthanize Lone Star Boris Badenough, his brother, Lone Star Drago, Lone Star Gideon and Bellwether Horatio.  We reached that agonizing decision after watching these magnificent animals struggle with chronic breathing problems, an aftermath of the Texas wildfires.  After taking care of the priority emergencies and losing several ewes that were ready to lamb, and lambs that were on the ground during the fires, we noticed these four rams had runny noses and some difficulty breathing.  Texas A&M students immediately bathed them to remove fire retardant, (dropped from planes trying to get control of the fire), along with soot and smoke.  Hospitalized for tests, the rams had chest X-rays, endoscopic exams of their sinuses, throat cultures and biopsies of their nasal passages.  There was nothing to be done except injections of Banamine (a pain killer) and Dexamethasone as an anti-inflammatory (side effects were, hopefully, only temporary sterility).  Quite a blow when you are dealing with animals that are rare and used for breeding. 

As astute observers of our website, I'm sure some of you have noticed that the pictures and pedigrees of some of our familiar breeding rams have been retired.  It was with much sadness in our hearts that we made the hard decision to euthanize Lone Star Boris Badenough, his brother, Lone Star Drago, Lone Star Gideon and Bellwether Horatio.  We reached that agonizing decision after watching these magnificent animals struggle with chronic breathing problems, an aftermath of the Texas wildfires.  After taking care of the priority emergencies and losing several ewes that were ready to lamb, and lambs that were on the ground during the fires, we noticed these four rams had runny noses and some difficulty breathing.  Texas A&M students immediately bathed them to remove fire retardant, (dropped from planes trying to get control of the fire), along with soot and smoke.  Hospitalized for tests, the rams had chest X-rays, endoscopic exams of their sinuses, throat cultures and biopsies of their nasal passages.  There was nothing to be done except injections of Banamine (a pain killer) and Dexamethasone as an anti-inflammatory (side effects were, hopefully, only temporary sterility).  Quite a blow when you are dealing with animals that are rare and used for breeding. 

As astute observers of our website, I'm sure some of you have noticed that the pictures and pedigrees of some of our familiar breeding rams have been retired.  It was with much sadness in our hearts that we made the hard decision to euthanize Lone Star Boris Badenough, his brother, Lone Star Drago, Lone Star Gideon and Bellwether Horatio.  We reached that agonizing decision after watching these magnificent animals struggle with chronic breathing problems, an aftermath of the Texas wildfires.  After taking care of the priority emergencies and losing several ewes that were ready to lamb, and lambs that were on the ground during the fires, we noticed these four rams had runny noses and some difficulty breathing.  Texas A&M students immediately bathed them to remove fire retardant, (dropped from planes trying to get control of the fire), along with soot and smoke.  Hospitalized for tests, the rams had chest X-rays, endoscopic exams of their sinuses, throat cultures and biopsies of their nasal passages.  There was nothing to be done except injections of Banamine (a pain killer) and Dexamethasone as an anti-inflammatory (side effects were, hopefully, only temporary sterility).  Quite a blow when you are dealing with animals that are rare and used for breeding. 

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Lone Star Farm / Barbados Blackbelly Sheep

Trying to put the animal's best interest ahead of our investment, we administered the medication as directed.  Two days later, we were back at A&M.  The rams were a little better, but apparently this condition was going to become a chronic problem we would have to deal with for some time.  As long as they seemed comfortable and happy, we would work around it.  However, as the condition along with the aging process, made life more difficult for them, we knew it was time to take control of the situation and have them euthanized.  Its not always easy to do the right thing, or even know what it is. 

Lone Star Gideon

As astute observers of our website, I'm sure some of you have noticed that the pictures and pedigrees of some of our familiar breeding rams have been retired.  It was with much sadness in our hearts that we made the hard decision to euthanize Lone Star Boris Badenough, his brother, Lone Star Drago, Lone Star Gideon and Bellwether Horatio.  We reached that agonizing decision after watching these magnificent animals struggle with chronic breathing problems, an aftermath of the Texas wildfires.  After taking care of the priority emergencies and losing several ewes that were ready to lamb, and lambs that were on the ground during the fires, we noticed these four rams had runny noses and some difficulty breathing.  Texas A&M students immediately bathed them to remove fire retardant, (dropped from planes trying to get control of the fire), along with soot and smoke.  Hospitalized for tests, the rams had chest X-rays, endoscopic exams of their sinuses, throat cultures and biopsies of their nasal passages.  There was nothing to be done except injections of Banamine (a pain killer) and Dexamethasone as an anti-inflammatory (side effects were, hopefully, only temporary sterility).  Quite a blow when you are dealing with animals that are rare and used for breeding. 

Significant Rams of the Past



                

They are certainly missed, but they will not be forgotten as we continue on with their presence ever before us in their sons, grandsons and great grandsons.  Their progeny will keep their legacy in tact for future generations here at Lone Star Farm.